Eric Lai of Computerworld for his story entitled “More Oracle users plumping for Linux”. (I was unable to find the original story on Computerworld, but it has been echoed on Techworld.com and elsewhere).
The story is about Oracle users wanting to consolidate servers and move to Linux. It also briefly mentions tooling, explaining that use of Oracle Application Express and Microsoft Visual Studio are growing, and then Eric makes the following profound statement:
IBM WebSphere and the open-source Eclipse toolkit are also picking up in popularity, while older toolkits such as PowerBuilder, ColdFusion, Borland and NetBeans are losing steam.
And yes, I know the point he is trying to make, But … a J2EE server, a visual tool, a server/language that has no specific tooling, a company, and a Java IDE … yeah, right, top notch reporting, Eric!

4 thoughts

  1. That does seem dumb. WebSphere can be the back end for lots of languages (including CF), and likewise Eclipse can be the IDE for lots of languages (including CF). Very uninformed…

  2. I think his use of Borland was in the same way that a large portion of people call a product by the company name, e.g. "Microsoft" instead of "Microsoft Windows XP Pro", etc. Personally I can’t stand it, doubly so when a product is called "Adobe" because invariable they’re talking about either Adobe Acrobat, Adobe Reader or Adobe Photoshop, and often different ones within the same conversation! The only time I can see it being reasonable to do so is when the company only produces one product, e.g. we call our vacuum cleaner a "Kirby" because they only make one item, a vacuum cleaner, and only ever have one revision of it on sale at any one time so you can’t confuse it with anything else.

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