I just did something that I never thought I would ever do, I deleted a thread from my blog. Well, I did not actually delete it (I could not bring myself to do that), but I did deactivate it, and that makes me cringe.
No, I am not back-peddling or retracting anything (I may reactivate the thread at some point), but for now it has been pulled. Between the e-mails, comment flames, and a voice-mail message (yes, some Neanderthal actually left me a threatening voice-mail on my work number), I gave in. Not that I honestly care what people think, but unlike some others who apparently have way too much time on their hands, I have real work to do and this is a distraction.
And so for now, the thread is dead. Now back to our regularly scheduled programming.

8 thoughts

  1. Good. I posted a comment to that thread, and I was getting an email everytime someone commented on that hotly contested topic.

  2. I think I recall reading a post on Ben’s blog about how PHP and ASP are judged differently when a flaw is found. I believe Ben cited the recent flaw found in PHP and the lack of an uproar surrounding its discovery versus the clamor that we’d all hear if a similar exploit were found in ASP.
    That post is now gone.
    It would have been accessible here…
    http://www.forta.com/blog/index.cfm?mode=e&entry=1433
    (Hopefully this won’t start the discussion up again.)

  3. Yeah its funny how "open source" gets by without no heat… But there’s a large "MS hater" comunity out there, just scope slashdot…

  4. ahh… I remember that post. I think that people have a tough time admitting that microsoft makes some good products. That being said, open-source has become a force to be reckoned with and ALL software vendors should plan accordingly. The free-software, paid-support model will take off in the next few years. I think the "security" argument regarding open source is a slippery slope because to date proprietary software has a much larger installed base, and thus more benefit to an exploit. On the contrary, open-source promotes transparency and I truly believe that the more eyes that see a piece of code, the better it becomes (and thus more secure, hopefully). I don’t know of "hardened-ASP" or "hardened-CF" orgs out there.

  5. Any who threaten due to a blog (no matter what medium) should really get a clue.
    My opinion those cretins fail life.
    Sad you have to treat this blog like a forum, where monkeys who sit behind terminals flame away but in real life situations probably too scared to say boo.
    Keep up the good work Ben! 🙂

  6. Hi Ben! I’m really sorry they forced you to remove a thread. You would think that programmers and other geeky types would be *logical* and *rational* and not resort to the type of behavior you described experiencing.
    Here’s an idea: Why don’t you send that post to a couple of us in the community and we can *all* put it up on our blogs (I didn’t even get the chance to read it but that’s not the point.) Will they be able to flame/silence a whole community of people? I think not. And this from an avid PHP fan who is trying to free up time to be more involved in the future of AMFPHP. It’s not about ASP, PHP, CF, etc., at all — it’s about the right to free speech and self expression. A right not easily earned and one that needs to be vigilantly protected.
    You would think that members of the open source community, of all people, would appreciate the importance of this. As a member of that community, I apologize to you for the treatment you’ve received in response to your post.

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