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Lee Brimelow Disproves Flash Rollover And Hover Concerns

Home » Lee Brimelow Disproves Flash Rollover And Hover Concerns

One of the frequent criticisms of Flash on devices is that hovers and rollovers won’t work as they were not designed for touch. Well, in this post and video, Lee Brimelow proves those critics and criticisms wrong.

2 responses to “Lee Brimelow Disproves Flash Rollover And Hover Concerns”

  1. Troy Avatar
    Troy

    To clarify a bit: the issue is not with Flash dispatching the correct events for touch devices, it’s whether or not the touch device platform implements a cursor. For the iPhone/iPad, there is no cursor, so there is no hover. Touching then dragging like shown in the video results in scrolling, not cursor movement like you would expect in a mouse environment. Obviously, this Toshiba tablet is running a Windows environment that does give you a cursor.
    So there are 2 solutions for products that don’t use a cursor(mainly Apple that I know of): either the sites that use hover state to effect the user experience significantly redesign their Flash apps to account for cursorless browsers, or Apple changes the way their products work to emulate a cursor for hover state. I’m guessing I know who will blink…
    And for the record, this is not just a problem with Flash apps. Sites that rely on hover state for Javascript menus or other essential components will need to account for cursorless platforms. Flash just seems to have a target on it’s back right now and is making the headlines.

  2. Troy Avatar
    Troy

    To clarify a bit: the issue is not with Flash dispatching the correct events for touch devices, it’s whether or not the touch device platform implements a cursor. For the iPhone/iPad, there is no cursor, so there is no hover. Touching then dragging like shown in the video results in scrolling, not cursor movement like you would expect in a mouse environment. Obviously, this Toshiba tablet is running a Windows environment that does give you a cursor.
    So there are 2 solutions for products that don’t use a cursor(mainly Apple that I know of): either the sites that use hover state to effect the user experience significantly redesign their Flash apps to account for cursorless browsers, or Apple changes the way their products work to emulate a cursor for hover state. I’m guessing I know who will blink…
    And for the record, this is not just a problem with Flash apps. Sites that rely on hover state for Javascript menus or other essential components will need to account for cursorless platforms. Flash just seems to have a target on it’s back right now and is making the headlines.

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