This sent to me by Russell Schneider of Super Warehouse in San Diego, CA:
Super Warehouse is a high energy and fast growing ecommerce company looking for an experienced Cold Fusion and/or Java developer with at least 3-5 years of experience. Can work remotely or on-site. Prefer fusebox experience. Will be working on our homegrown order management and content management systems. Please contact Giana and attach your resume.

17 thoughts

  1. I’m not sure about everyone else, but I subscribe to this RSS feed for info on Coldfusion and am not interested in seeing jobs.
    I don’t think someone in your position should be reposting Jobs, it makes the whole Coldfusion Community seem really small, also think that you are setting yourself up for everyone to request their position be posted.
    I guess if you really want to do this, can I suggest another RSS category.

  2. Look,
    I’m not going to get into stupid comments, it was only a suggestion and if he doesn’t want to consider it he doesn’t have to.
    But the comment system is here for a reason.
    Regards
    Dale Fraser

  3. Dale & Scott,
    The reason this post is here is because of a discussion I had with Ben about what a great challenge it has been for us to find brilliant Cold Fusion experts. What other RSS category could you guys suggest?
    Thank you very much for your feedback.

  4. That’s exactly what I thought when I read the post and this is the reason I put the "Coldfusion Community seem really small" comment.
    I’m in Australia and have the same problems finding people, I just feel that this type of post highlights the issue.
    Now i’m not saying sweep it under the carpet and hope it goes away, but there are better methods than resorting to the Chief Product Evangilist IMHO.

  5. Valid points. I did create a JOBS category to keep these post seperate for those who don’t want to see them, but then selected more than a single category when I made the post. I’ll be sure to use a single category in the future.
    As for the comments about community, yep, I kind of agree, but as these posts have been few and far between I did’nt think that it was that big a deal. But maybe it is. Hummmm.

  6. >>> The reason this post is here is because of a discussion I had with Ben about what a great challenge it has been for us to find brilliant Cold Fusion experts
    I’m in San Diego, and I see that you are posting for CF developers all the time. Are you seriously ‘not’ getting any replies – or are you finding that people do not qualify? You may want to consider a different strategy, and work with a CF development firm instead of placing a few full time developer’s on payroll. If you are needing a CF developer on a daily basis, you may want to rethink how your staff interacts with your systems, and look for ways to have a CF developer create better tools so your marketing, sales, etc. staff can run the site without the daily need of a developer.
    Another option – is to go to the local CFUG meeting, contact Cameron Childres first, and see if you can do a presentation about your company and how it uses CF, and try to stimulate some interest that way.
    Good luck – keep your ‘brilliant’ requirement in perspective – and maybe lighten up that homepage, with so many items listed, it’s impossible to look at, and unfriendly. You may want to consider reading "Don’t Make Me Think" by S. Krug
    ——
    BTW – Dale Fraser, I subscribe to around 80+ feeds, and a few aggregators, when I see a blog post that doesn’t jive with my interests or needs, I click to the next item and keep on moving. There’s far too many cool and amazing things to check out and learn. 🙂
    Hi Ben 🙂
    Hasta,
    Gideon Marken

  7. Yikes. I’ve done work for this company, and I know three other (extremely qualified) people who have also. It’ll end in tears. You’ve been warned.

  8. Thank you Gideon for your advice. We are getting replies and have a few very bright programmers on staff already. We are just looking to expand and have ambitious projects planned.
    In regards to Jim’s post, I don’t recall a Jim ever having worked for our company, but I do know that we have 54 people working here now and are one of the fastest growing ecommerce companies in San Diego. We are having a great time.

  9. I couldn’t help but laugh when I read Gideon’s last comment ".. and maybe lighten up that homepage, with so many items listed, it’s impossible to look at, and unfriendly. You may want to consider reading "Don’t Make Me Think" by S. Krug"
    It made me curious, so I checked out the web site and instantly had flashbacks to the hellish nightmare of web development at a certain e-commerce company near Seattle. I won’t name names but let’s say it’s a store that sells drugs and rhymes with ShrugFloor.bomb. I see this Super Warehouse suffering from the same problem. Too many marketing/business folks who are running out of substantial work so they try to stay employed by coming up with asinine garbage to inundate the site with.
    At its core, a successful e-commerce site needs a few things:
    1) Good Inventory (you can’t sell what people don’t want)
    2) Broad Inventory (you can’t sell what you don’t have)
    3) Cheap Inventory (you can’t get out priced)
    4) Internal Searchability (good navigation and search features)
    5) External Searchability (hopefully you’ll show up on search engines)
    6) Informative Product Data (educate and empower the consumer)
    There are a few more things that make e-commerce sites more successful such as support, appropriate correspondence with customers, and availability and ease of use of customer accounts. But as much as some people hate to accept this, an e-commerce site need not be complicated, intricate, busy, or loaded with crap that maybe 1% of customers would use to be successful.
    So what happens when an e-commerce site gets off the ground and becomes well established? All the marketing efforts and search engine friendly design and key word strategies begin to pay off. People start visiting the site. They’re buying. New inventory is being added via the back end. The store is running. Well, the sad fact is that at this point you’ve got this massive business/marketing workforce with the bulk of their work finished. But these spin-masters enjoy their corner offices too much to accept a handshake and nice goodbye. So instead, they start spinning like hamsters in wheel and come up with ideas that lead to … well … superwarehouse.com. Proof: ShrugFloor.bomb is still using legacy ASP. Not because they want to, but because THEY HAVE NO CHOICE. Code change at this point would be catastrophic in terms of man-hours and effort.
    So now, instead of the site being your sales tool and an asset, it becomes this giant behemoth that is constantly being changed and maintained by a series of programmers and contractors coming though the dev groups revolving doors. The code accumulates and becomes an insatiable black hole of man-hours and money. The only solution is to hire more programmers and project leads. This of course, only cements the need for business and marketing spin which is now deemed as the only way to increase revenues in order to support all these programmers. Things spiral out of hand and you’ve got yourself a virtual Boeing. And here’s another newsflash. Those so called “brilliant” developers you’re looking for … sorry … they can’t help you. They’ll be too busy sorting through the quagmire of convoluted code to come up with any original ideas. Soon, they too, will be swimming in panic mode, trying to survive having long since abandoned any aspirations of actually doing something “brilliant”. I surf this site and I can practically smell the burning buns of the poor devs who can only fantasize about the days of elegant, compact code and logical, streamlined transactions as they get tossed every which way by the marketing geniuses.
    You know that scene at the end of Good Will Hunting where the shrink played by Robin Williams finally gets the boy to breakdown and come out of denial …. Russell … It’s not your fault. You don’t need to pretend you’re having a good time … give me hug … it’s not your fault.

  10. Jim – you know, I was getting the impression something was wrong over there. Unfortunately, annonymous posts don’t carry much value in my mind, so I’ll select to hold off on judging Super Warehouse.
    Ardi Mekanik gets ‘post of the month’ 🙂
    Russell, everything can be an opportunity – like your homepage, it’s an opportunity to get your staff jazzed about change. Run a contest, ask everyone to submit a layout or design idea, and harvest the talent around you. Or – run a focus group and get some honest feedback on your site, it’s interface, etc. Grab Krug’s book to, you’ll finish it in a snap, then you’ll need to get a few more copies for your managers, etc.
    Good luck with the site,
    Gideon Marken

  11. Ardi and Gideon,
    Thanks for your posts. Ardi – yours was entertaining, but had many assumptions based on your own experience. I am sorry that you got burned. That was one company experience though, and there are lots of different companies and dynamics out there. We have been in business 8 years, have grown fast, are profitable, and are having a great time. Our company has an awesome team of people.
    Super Warehouse is still small and efficient. We have a small development team of a few people. Since we had grown so fast over the past few years with such a small team, we are now at the place where we are looking to add.
    Our tens of thousands of repeat customers provide mainly positive feedback and keep coming back so we like to make changes that matter to them. We are very actively engaged with our clients and basically design the site around their needs. Of course, we do need to improve in many ways and that’s why we are looking for programmers.
    There are always different opinions out there. When it comes down to it, there is not one magic formula that works for every site. For example, Godaddy.com is extemely successful, but their site is busier than rush hour in New York city.
    Thanks again for your insight and opinions,
    Russ Schneider

  12. Russell,
    You bring up some good points. Sorry for the excessive assupmtions. I think I had too much coffee the day I wrote that post. Quick clarification … I wouldn’t say I got "burned" but I did observe a lot of chaos and ineffciency. And yes, I did loose some inspiration.
    Best of luck to you and the dev team in the future.
    – Ardi

  13. i know the company inside and out, what many people have said are true. honestly i feel for this guy. i gave him everything i had and some of the ideas i suggested to him before this blog was ever written have been explained to him before. Andi….your post is dead truth.
    that doesnt mean however the company is not successful in what it does. Russ has been successful…but the guy is ultimately a micro-manager. He owns the company so that is his perogative..even so he will probably never realize his dreams of becoming a major player in the industry because his company will only grow as far as his own arms reach.
    if any of you indeed sign on with this company, my suggestion is that you stand up for yourself. dont let him run you over. set your boundries early.

  14. i know the company inside and out, what many people have said are true. honestly i feel for this guy. i gave him everything i had and some of the ideas i suggested to him before this blog was ever written have been explained to him before. Andi….your post is dead truth.
    that doesnt mean however the company is not successful in what it does. Russ has been successful…but the guy is ultimately a micro-manager. He owns the company so that is his perogative..even so he will probably never realize his dreams of becoming a major player in the industry because his company will only grow as far as his own arms reach.
    if any of you indeed sign on with this company, my suggestion is that you stand up for yourself. dont let him run you over. set your boundries early.

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