Since the announcement hit the wire this morning, the various ColdFusion related lists have been buzzing with rumors, speculation, and predictions. Of course, that is all they are, rumors, speculation, and predictions. I don’t think anyone really knows what this means for any product yet, and it’ll be a while until all that gets figured out. But, here is my take on what this means for ColdFusion.
When Allaire and Macromedia merged the community asked the same questions and had the same misgivings. Back then I repeatedly said that as long as ColdFusion continued to do well there would be no risk of it being put out to pasture, there would be no reason to do away with a successful product. And that has proven to be the case. Under the Macromedia name we released a brand-new rearchitected ColdFusion in CFMX, and more recently the most customer-driven feature-rich ColdFusion to date in CFMX7. Obviously, ColdFusion transitioning from a small company (Allaire) to a big company (Macromedia) did not hurt ColdFusion at all. On the contrary, ColdFusion continues to thrive.
So what comes next? What happens to ColdFusion when it transitions to an even bigger company (Adobe)? My response would have to be the same. If CFMX7 were not doing well I’d be worried (with or without acquisition announcements). But CFMX7 is doing very well, sales have exceeded expectations, and customers are very happy with the product. And so the ColdFusion team is already working on what comes next, planning the next release (figuring out what and when it will be). There is no reason for that to change.
Will ColdFusion change in some way? I’d hope so. It took a couple of versions of Macromedia influence to see great new CFMX7 feature like Flash Forms, and I’d hope that in the future we’d see integration with Adobe offerings, resulting in features and technologies that would enable us to build even better applications faster than ever before. Those would be very welcome changes. Aside from that, the ColdFusion team is as committed to the product as they have ever been, and are excitedly planning on setting the bar even higher than we just did with CFMX7.
And now, back to work on CF ===censored=== planning.

This is my own message, my own words, and it was not edited by anyone else. But, I was required to obtain approval before posting it, and am also required to include the following legalese:
Forward-Looking Statements:
This document includes “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the safe harbor provisions of the United States Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Words such as “expect,” “estimate,” “project,” “budget,” “forecast,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “plan,” “may,” “will,” “could,” “should,” “believes,” “predicts,” “potential,” “continue,” and similar expressions are intended to identify such forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements in this document include, without limitation, forecasts of market growth, future revenue, benefits of the proposed merger, expectations that the merger will be accretive to Adobe’s results, future expectations concerning available cash and cash equivalents [following the merger with Macromedia and Adobe’s expectations with respect to future stock repurchases, including the timing and amount of such repurchases, and other matters that involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause actual results, levels of activity, performance or achievements to differ materially from results expressed or implied by this presentation. Such risk factors include, among others: difficulties encountered in integrating merged businesses; uncertainties as to the timing of the merger; approval of the transaction by the stockholders of the companies; the satisfaction of closing conditions to the transaction, including the receipt of regulatory approvals; whether certain market segments grow as anticipated; the competitive environment in the software industry and competitive responses to the proposed merger; and whether the companies can successfully develop new products and the degree to which these gain market acceptance. Actual results may differ materially from those contained in the forward-looking statements in this presentation. Additional information concerning these and other risk factors is contained in Adobe’s and Macromedia’s most recently filed Forms 10-K and 10-Q.
Adobe and Macromedia undertake no obligation and do not intend to update these forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances occurring after this document. You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this document. All forward-looking statements are qualified in their entirety by this cautionary statement.
Additional Information and Where to Find It
Adobe Systems Incorporated intends to file a registration statement on Form S-4, and Adobe and Macromedia, Inc. intend to file a related joint proxy statement/prospectus, in connection with the merger transaction involving Adobe and Macromedia. Investors and security holders are urged to read the registration statement on Form S-4 and the related joint proxy/prospectus when they become available because they will contain important information about the merger transaction. Investors and security holders may obtain free copies of these documents (when they are available) and other documents filed with the SEC at the SEC’s web site at http://www.sec.gov. In addition, investors and security holders may obtain free copies of the documents filed with the SEC by Adobe by contacting Adobe Investor Relations at 408-536-4416. Investors and security holders may obtain free copies of the documents filed with the SEC by Macromedia by contacting Macromedia Investor Relations at 415-252-2106.
Adobe, Macromedia and their directors and executive officers may be deemed to be participants in the solicitation of proxies from the stockholders of Adobe and Macromedia in connection with the merger transaction. Information regarding the special interests of these directors and executive officers in the merger transaction will be included in the joint proxy statement/prospectus of Adobe and Macromedia described above. Additional information regarding the directors and executive officers of Adobe is also included in Adobe’s proxy statement for its 2005 Annual Meeting of Stockholders, which was filed with the SEC on March 14, 2005. Additional information regarding the directors and executive officers of Macromedia is also included in Macromedia’s proxy statement for its 2004 Annual Meeting of Stockholders, which was filed with the SEC on June 21, 2004. These documents are available free of charge at the SEC’s web site at http://www.sec.gov and from Investor Relations at Adobe and Macromedia as described above.

35 thoughts

  1. This was exactly what I wanted to hear.
    Thanks for the mundanely obvious words of hope for "OUR" passion, ColdFusion. It also should show ya what passion there is for ColdFusion, given the outpouring of whatever you call what has been going on all day on the lists!!!
    🙂 take it easy man.
    tony

  2. I would really like to know what the top guys are saying about CF and its future. Will it just become a server-side pdf generator with some flash forms on top?

  3. Ben,
    I am sure I am not the only CF Developer who has looked to your blog for some insight. But what took so long???;-)
    While I wasn’t part of the CF community when the Alaire acquisition took place, and I don’t have the level of involvement as you do, I share your belief that as long as ColdFusion continues being…well, ColdFusion…than we developers should have our favorite application server for a long time to come.

  4. Ben –
    I hope none from the cfmx personnel gets laid off, but some MM people will loss their job. Redundant personnel in IT, Sales, HR, Acct and other departments usually loss their job. Look at Oracle/Peoplesoft merger as a ‘BAD’ example (6000 on 1 day). I think CF, Flex, Dreamweaver, Flash, Breeze will stay and Freehand, Fireworks and Central will go away. There will be a new Studio including the best of both companies. Adobe wants profitable lines because they sent twice their annual revenues.

  5. I hope at least Fireworks stays but yeah, unlikely, and Central has gone very quiet of late, haven’t ecen bothered installing it on my new Acer Aspire 1800 notebook.
    And yeah hope all the CFMX team keep their jobs, and Ed Sullivan, Amy Brooks, Mike Chambers, Sean Corfield and all the rest of the dedicated Macromedians (including Ben of course).

  6. Hmmm, another unpleasant thought…
    I’ve been using ColdFusion since 1995 so hopefully ColdFusion will be a Macromedia product when it has it’s 10th birthday (about July/August from memory).
    We should organise a birthday party – 10 years in the Internet market might as well be 70 years and is a considerable achievement!

  7. I think all I can say to this is:
    RIP Macromedia, you were well loved. I guess it was too good to last.
    Do I sound pessimistic about this, Yes because I see the death of some of my favorite programs. Adobe can not do web, they never have been able to. And I don’t think they can buy it either. I see Fireworks and Freehand definitely going the way of the Dodo and Adobe slowly corrupting all the other products that remain. If they couldn’t get GoLive right (and they bought that as well) what makes you think they can do any better with Dreamweaver?
    Time to take a serious look at AJAX.

  8. Look Adobe lost my business over 5 years ago, Macromedia cornered the web market and took it in the future. Studio MX was the first as a bundled product and Adobe HAD to copy it. Adobe is good at video and print. Web programs have been a failure for them, the only way out was to buy Macromedia. Flash Paper scared them white. They don’t have Macromedia’s vision and they definitely are stuck on themselves, read the CEO statement just today how THEIR technologies with Macromedia Flash will set new standards. Hello . .. Macromedia has continued to make the best web based products period. Adobe has dreamed of reaching the heights Macromedia has in technology and vision. The only way this works is if Macromedia stays together and Adobe provides capital for it to continue with its products and state of the art innovations for the web. Adobe has never kept up and the print/video market has been around 3 times or more the amount the web has, so they have the money to do it. It’s ashame and very sad that Macromedia just doesn’t stand strong and stay the company they are. Adobe just doesn’t get it they buy it.

  9. well since you’re already planning on the next version, what about having cf use the common locale data repository (CLDR) for its locale data? that would be sweet.

  10. So what happens to SVG? Adobe have touted it as the Flash killer as its an open standard blah, blah, blah, blah.
    And the SVG server products? Hmmm no overlap with Flex at all.
    Also what happens to Flash Paper? Cos PDF is another one of Adobe’s favourites (mind you the reader is now the size of a small
    And GoLive? In a face off against Dreamweaver should be toast.
    But sometimes these decisions aren’t based on common sense or an assessment of the technical pros and cons. And anyone who thinks they are is just plain naive.
    Is Adobe about to turn into another Quark? Who are immensely lousy at many things because they have effectively cornered their niche market and are happily deluding themselves that where they go their customers will follow.
    Adobe has been leaning that way for some time.
    But who knows it may yet get blocked.

  11. seems we are missing some big pictures.
    Adobe is running around because it’s scared of Bill of Washington. Both MM and Adobe need the synergy to survive MicroSoft
    Some products will die (on both sides) but we can’t say Adobe will be lousy unless we can say categorically that their management are foolish and inept.
    Remember that almost all of MM products were bought and either upgraded or killed. Remember Splash Cell Animator????

  12. I do have concerns. Again, the majority of government and corporate clients in the DC Metro area do not allow or want Flash. I am holding my reservations for now since Macromedia did come through and turn CF into something even more amazing than the language I love. I do worry that this is yet another slap in the face for the community that the perception out there will be hard to overcome for CF as a true business application language. I fear that when I recommend CF I’ll hear "Oh you mean that graphics language?" I dare to dream that Sun will buy the CF stuff and just give us the true programmer credentials already. I fear that Adobe won’t continue the work and amazing progress with Java and the other application building tools. I fear they will force things like Flash and make it impossible for me to use with my clients. BUT, these are just fears. I will definitely be in the CFUN 05!! I hope to hear more before then, but hope to see more at the conference.

  13. > Time to take a serious look at AJAX.
    haha, we’ll be here waiting when you get back! Once you realize what AJAX is for.

  14. What ever happens won’t happen over night. There will be a huge press announcement. People will react. People will think the end time is near. But in reality look how long it’s taken Microsoft to phase out ‘classic ASP’ in favor of .NET. Once companies invest in a certain methodology (read Microsoft vs. non-Microsoft) they typically don’t go back. They’ve spent too much money and will expect a certain ROI on their hard spent money. Relax keep coding. It never hurts to pick up a Java or .NET book. Why box yourself in to one technology. I don’t care what technology I use at work (.NET, Java, CF), just as long as their check cashes and I enjoy where I work! Relax people. There’s bigger things to worry about!

  15. In response to Bonnie Betts and DC’s dislike for flash – I think it’s because flash is horribily in accessible to individuals with special needs. I work at a University in DC and we tend to err against flash for critical applications just for this reason. Students or staff who are blind really don’t care much for flash!

  16. Ben,
    If you haven’t seen this yet.. check this out..
    http://www.tbray.org/ongoing/When/200x/2005/04/18/Adobe-Macromedia
    Tom Bray’s blog from Sun Microsystem… in my opinion he’s trying to scare Flash Developers into looking at "something else".. umm.. could it be JAVA’S answer to RIA.. SWING??? I understand having personal interests.. but in my opinion.. this is a little low..
    I hope I’m not being too critical here.. I would like to hear your thoughts on this if you are able to talk about it…
    Cheers…

  17. Ben…
    I got an idea… should we all wear BLACK t-shirts for the first day at CFUN as a sign of mourning for the company we came to love so much!!!!… Not because of all the speculations about what products will go and stay.. but for the company who’s name will eventually go away..
    Here’s a possible logo (stealing from </hassle>)..
    </macromedia>
    Just an idea…
    Cheers..

  18. I think everyone I’ve heard on all of the forums so far sounds WAY too complacent about this bullsh*t.
    I am pissed! We are the backbone of Macromedia. WE, the developers are! Where were the indicators? Who conducted a survey on what WE thought of such a transition? When was there even the slightest implication that something remotely like this might ever occur?!
    Maybe you think I’m writing this because I fear change or innovation. HELL NO! The reason I’m writing this is because I embrace those things. I embrace all of those things that will be devoured by Adobe and their antiquated methodology.
    The bright, innovative efforts of Macromedia will succumb to a flawed corporate engine. Innovation will become an afterthought while prices soar alongside bugs, feature-creep and years worth of integration issues.
    This was devious and intentional… Macromedia is known for it’s dedication to customer service and response to user feedback. In all major releases of every product and every patch, update and upgrade, there has ALWAYS been a consistent and apparent effort on MACR’s part to respond proactively with a positive solution. This event has been devoid of anything of that nature whatsoever.
    We were duped, left in the lurch, F!CKED by a few nameless SOB’s who have their noses deep up Wall Street’s ass too far to realize WE PAY THEIR SALARIES!
    This notion that it’s beyond our control and within the hands of fat cats behind the scenes is ridiculous… If the throngs of developers worldwide who have been champions of Macromedia for years don’t stand up and PROTEST THIS then it will happen.
    I can attest to one thing for sure – if this goes through, I will immediately switch to .NET and enthusiastically paint the Internet with my severe distaste for the abomination this "acquisition" is.
    The Borg have arrived…

  19. Exposing the most easy-to-learn dynamic web development language (CF) that seamlessly integrates with the webs most popular visual presentation technology (Flash) to the largest concentration of designers in the world (Adobe customers) and making it possible for the tools they already use ( PhotoShop, InDesign, Illustrator, Acrobat, Dreamweaver, & Flash ) to work seamlessly together. While at the same time become the largest Design / Web Development focused company in the world… Yep, sounds like a big mistake, what are they thinking. 🙂
    What will actually come of this wont be known for some time yet. But there are some real up sides to be considered. I think it’s good to take a more positive wait-and-see approach.

  20. The largest concentration of designers? What about the largest concentration of (web) developers who have little or nothing to gain from Adobe’s offering? Photoshop is powerful, I can certainly attest to that. However, Adobe’s other leading product, Acrobat, has already been eclipsed by recent innovations from Macromedia. Let me put it this way, Macromedia is revolutionary, Adobe is reactionary.
    On the flip side, I would be VERY excited and see this in a highly optimistic light if it were Macromedia who would be acquiring Adobe. In that instance, I would be doing cartwheels at the possibilities of taking the best features of Photoshop and Acrobat to round out the MX suite.
    You make a lot of assumptions about what will be happening out of the gates in this acquisition. Do you realistically think that this seamless integration will be present in the first Macrobe suite incarnation? It’s been my experience that these things take years and numerous versions to be anything close to effective. And considering that Adobe has NEVER demonstrated an ability to develop or market any substantial web app’s effectively, yes, I’m inclined to look negatively on this disast…, sorry, acquisition.
    Adobe does not have a presence of any depth or worth in the development community. GoLive? Come on… DreamWeaver and the whole MX suite is the epitome of efficient design and integration. Hell, I can’t even get the activation codes to play happy with my machine in Adobe products.
    Listen, I don’t have it out for Adobe. They do what they do well. They don’t make a habit of spearheading change and innovation, but their core products are strong and effective. Although I may sound it, I am not a cynical person. However, I do not support this or think that it is an effective solution to anything.
    First of all, where was the problem to begin with? Aside from the money to be had by those who wish to remain nameless, what warrants this? WHAT does Adobe really bring to the table besides a check? Macromedia’s numbers have been steady and growth has been present in virtually every recent quarter. Beyond that, Macromedia’s products and feature set are in a different universe than Adobe’s.
    Face it, the only REALY products that Adobe offers that are of any significance to that vast majority of developers/designers are Photoshop and Acrobat. Conversely virtually everything Macromedia brings to the table is embraced by the development community.
    It is Macromedia who should be acquiring Adobe…

  21. Jim, I think that you should refrain from speaking for all of us ("we developers") when you are arguing against developers. It makes the rest of your arguments seem less valid.
    And if you have so much of a problem with this acquisition that you would jump ship on CF pre-emptively, you must not value CF very much. If you think that a business decision that may not even affect CF (or may affect it in a good way) is worth abandoning CF for ASP.NET, then you clearly have a much different opinion than I do of the value of CF in comparison to ASP.NET. In that respect, your attitude also makes your arguments seem less valid. If you don’t like it as much as I do, why would I care if you switch for political reasons?
    You certainly haven’t convinced me to "rise up against the man" and threaten to switch to software built by "the even more evil man." I can’t even decide if your arguments have merit because they are so riddled with inflammatory nonsense that it distracts me from your actual arguments.
    What are your actual arguments again?

  22. Jennifer, I think his argument are as follows:
    – The bright, innovative efforts of Macromedia will succumb to a flawed corporate engine.
    – Macromedia is known for it’s dedication to customer service and response to user feedback. Adobe is not know for these qualities.
    – developers who have little or nothing to gain from Adobe’s offering?
    – Macromedia is revolutionary, Adobe is reactionary.
    – They [Adobe] don’t make a habit of spearheading change and innovation.
    – We were duped … by a few nameless SOB’s who have their noses deep up Wall Street’s ass too far to realize WE PAY THEIR SALARIES!

  23. That’ll be really convincing. "I made this survey about ColdFusion where none of the answers say that the merger is ok with them and look! No one voted that the merger is ok with them! See? I’m right! Nobody wants the merger!"
    And I particularly enjoy the flash poll:
    Option 1: Adobe insult, but it’s ok
    Option 2: Adobe insult, and it’s not ok.
    Option 3: Reword option 2 to make the insult more subtle.
    Well, I guess you are doing a good job of convincing people that the naysayers are irrational.

  24. As for being duped by nameless SOBs, you can look up the names of the Board of Directors and they never told you that they would be around forever, nor did they even imply it. They never did anything to dupe you and they are not nameless. I can’t believe that people have resorted to trolling on Ben’s blog and setting up completely one-sided "discussion forums" dedicated to complaining about the proposed merger with 48 hours of the announcement. It’s not like we’re talking about Macromedia being bought by Microsoft. Or AOL/Time Warner. Or Exxon. Or Satan. Or Cthulu. Or the Quebequois (not that I have anything against the Quebequois).
    Calm down. Think about what’s going on. Have a beer or something and chill out. Come back to this when you think you can have a rational discussion about it. Has it yet occurred to you that the reason that people are presenting arguments as to why it’s ok is not because they are mindless and complacent but because they’ve thought about it and think it’s ok?
    If you have a problem with Adobe being reactionary, you should take a long hard look at yourself.
    My troll feeding session is now over.

  25. Jennifer.. AMEN!!!
    As for Steven’s http://www.votenomerger.org, all have to say is… If you have stocks in Macromedia, you will get your vote through the right forum when Macromedia brings it up to their stockholders.. if you don’t.. guess what? Tough! If you cared so much about the company, you should have bought stocks… otherwise you have no vote! Personally, I don’t have stocks on Macromedia (kicking myself right now but that’s how life goes!!!) however, I’m not going to speculate, bash, or criticize the actions of all involved in the merger… It’s both infantile and irresponsible. The answers will come out when appropriate… meanwhile I suggest you take Jennifer’s advice..
    Cheers…

  26. Although I’d rather not see the merger happen I am open to change. These are my views on what should be done with the products from Macromedia. Also, I think Macromedia’s website it lightyears in front of Adobe’s.
    Authorware 7
    – KEEP, it rocks and they don’t have a competing product.
    Breeze
    – KEEP, it rocks, they don’t have a competing product and it’s all Flash anyway.
    Captivate
    – KEEP, it rocks and they don’t have a competing product.
    Central
    – WHO THE HELL KNOWS, this functionality should be included or as a free option with the base Flash player/creator anyway.
    ColdFusion MX 7 Enterprise
    ColdFusion MX 7 Standard
    – KEEP, it rocks and they don’t have a competing product.
    Contribute
    – KEEP, Dreamweaver and Web Publishing System integration.
    Director MX 2004
    – KEEP, it rocks and they don’t have a competing product.
    Dreamweaver MX 2004
    – KEEP, features in GoLive that do not exist in Dreamweaver may be incoporated. GoLive = GONE.
    eLearning Suite
    – KEEP, it consist of all the products were going to keep, although it may be rebranded.
    Fireworks MX 2004
    – GONE, features that do not exist in ImageReady/Photoshop may be incorporated.
    Flash Communication Server MX
    Flash Remoting MX
    FlashCast
    Flash Lite
    Flash MX 2004
    Flash MX Professional 2004
    Flash Ad Kit
    Flash Player
    Flash Player for Pocket PC
    Flash Player SDK
    – KEEP, a couple of notes on Flash and it’s companion products. All companion products should be free, i.e. Flash Communication Server MX and Flash Remoting MX, except for the server products geared toward mobile operators/carriers and device manufacturers.
    FlashPaper 2
    – KEEP (FOR NOW), Acrobat, probably in it’s next release will include the functionality to save/convert to FlashPaper.
    Flex
    – KEEP, but the price should be lowered, considerably. It’s currently $12,000 for two processors. Pricing should be about $2,999 for unlimited processors. It’s a good tool but the same can be done in Flash MX Pro, with some work of course. Promote and manage it correctly, plus with the jumpstart it could deliver a massive blow to Microsoft’s upcoming Avalon/Sparkle XAML technology.
    Fontographer
    – IT WAS ALREADY GONE, although it was and still is a decent font creator/editor. I would love to see this program updated to Windows XP/OSX standards and new features added.
    FreeHand MX
    – GONE, features that do not exist in Illustrator may be incorporated.
    HomeSite 5.5
    – GONE
    JRun 4
    – KEEP (FOR NOW), ColdFusion is intergrated with this, although it may be killed off later as ColdFusion can run on most any Java application server. One thought is too keep it but offer it for free since ColdFusion uses this in it’s standard install.
    RoboHelp X5
    RoboInfo 5
    – KEEP, good stuff.
    Shockwave Player
    – KEEP, it’s key for Director and Authorware applications but I think it should be rolled into the Flash player.
    SoundEdit 16
    – IT WAS ALREADY GONE. Adobe has Audition 1.5, good product in it’s day though.
    Studio MX 2004
    Studio MX 2004 with Flash Pro
    – ASSIMILATED INTO CS SUITE, Dreamweaver and Flash stays, Freehand and Fireworks gone. People will still continue to use Freehand, Fireworks for many years though.
    Web Publishing System
    – KEEP, content management and collaboration is getting hotter.

  27. Good for them. Bad for the users.
    No more competitions.
    If they release PhotoFlash, a photoshop and flash application, might be interested.

  28. Two companies with a great web application tools combine to make powerful web application tools!
    Its usually always for the better but how about the price for these product.
    We don’t have any option to look into if we cannot afford about the product.
    Looking forward for the products pricing hopes its affordable.

  29. I always talk about ColdFusion like "the application" since the first day I learned ColdFusion. However, after I heard about this merge, I start to loss faith on the product and I am worry that one day this company will be buy by Microsoft. then guess what will happen to ColdFusion, it will vanish in order for ASP.NET to be the leader in the market. I don’t think this is impossible to happen since the company has history to be in inquire by another company. It was Allaire before it got inquire by Macromedia and now they got inquire by Adobe and one day it will get inquire by company which going to kill this application. When that happen then all of the ColdFusion programmer have to start all over again and learn other product like ASP.NET.
    For myself I am going to take a short cut and start to learn more about ASP.NET to be more professional in ASP.NET before that day come and be out of luck and job.

  30. First:
    "Why box yourself in to one technology. I don’t care what technology I use at work (.NET, Java, CF)"
    Fat chance to find someone as good in all these as someone who specializes.
    here’s what I think, not that it matters but….
    When I first heard this, I thought I need to brush on php. Then I started paying attention. Php is used in alot of applications but mostly in smaller, low budget companies(not all but most).Most large companies will invest in backed products like .net or cfmx.
    In canada, most of the government sites run on cf and I just noticed that Telus is cf. I think if keeping cf is a question of money, quite a few people will throw in the buck to keep it alive.
    And now with this transition, a lot of people ran away. Guess who’s gonna get the job, when this is over. $$CACHING$$

  31. Did anyone notice the strange fact that ColdFusion, as far as I could see, was not mentioned in the Adobe announcement. It seemed that every other Macromedia product was assigned a place in one of Adobe’s groups. Is it just that Adobe doesn’t know where to put CF? It seems to me that completely omitting CF from mention is not a great sign. Here is the page I have in mind:
    http://www.adobe.com/aboutadobe/invrelations/adobeandmacromedia_faq.html#operations
    Note that under "How is the combined company structured" they assign most of Macromedia’s products (at least the ones I know of) to a working group in Adobe. Not ColdFusion; there is no mention of CF (or "Fusion" for that matter) in the whole article.

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