Knowledge@Wharton, the Wharton School’s online publication of business insight and commentary, recently spoke to Macromedia CEO Rob Burgess and CFO Betsey Nelson in Macromedia’s San Francisco headquarters to explore where the company sees its opportunities and threats. The interview is now online at http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/index.cfm?fa=viewArticle&id=1059. Thanks to Kendall Whitehouse, Director of Advanced Technology Development at The Wharton School, for bringing this one to my attention.

5 thoughts

  1. I find it really interesting that there is no mention, whatsoever of ColdFusion. <sarcasm>The future of ColdFusion is looking "brighter" every day.</sarcasm>

  2. that’s not fair, Ben.
    The point Aidan is making is that, being Macromedia’s server technology to compete with ASP.NET and M$’s marketing push, PHP’s install base, etc, we CF’ers are expecting more in brand awareness. For the simple fact that more orgs are moving away from CF to ASP.NET et al (notice the flat sales, Ben?) means that it is NOT upmost in CTO thoughts.
    Blackstone is a diversion. You’ll find a (not few) orgs that won’t bother upgrading to CF7 and let the line and apps die out.
    CF7’s new features isn’t enough. CFdoc and Cfreport are nice but hardly worth the upgrade. The flex-type add-ins don’t go far enough (all of Flex should be in CF7 ent IMHO).
    MM doesn’t make enough noise about running the same codebase on Linux or Java integration, outside those already converted.
    A lot more people have heard of ASP than CF and for that Aidan’s comments can be justified – esp regarding the interview.

  3. I been paying close attention to Blackstone. I attended CFUN this year and I have been fortunate enough to be in contact with a friend who’s had a copy since the alpha. I’m really impressed by Blackstone. I still find it intriguing though that for the past 2 years (since ColdFusion MX was released with less than expected results) there is almost absolutely no mention of ColdFusion. It is obvious (and for good reasons) that Flash is Macromedia’s money maker. Since there are currently no "real" threat the Flash, I would promote that product ahead of ColdFusion anyday; it only makes sense. BUT, where does that leave us ColdFusion folks. If Macromedia doesn’t seem to be publicly committed to ColdFusion why should I spend my $$ on it. I’m attending Max again this year. My boss has warned me that if there isn’t enough ColdFusion support, we switch to ASP.Net. I’m crossing my finger…

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