Blog

Blog posts made in May 2012
30May
2012
ColdFusion 10 Developer Week 2012

Five days, nineteen sessions on ColdFusion 10. Registration for ColdFusion 10 Developer Week 2012 is now open.

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29May
2012
Three Important ANE Articles

Adobe AIR native extensions (ANE's) are a combination of ActionScript classes and native code that provide easy access to device-specific libraries and features otherwise not available to your AIR applications. ADC has just published articles on three ANE's that will be of use to your mobile app development:

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28May
2012
HTC One X Two Week Report

I've been using an HTC One X for about two weeks now. I usually share my thoughts on devices sooner than this. But, I've now had a couple of devices work well in the U.S. only to disappoint when taken on the road. So, with being in Asia briefly last week, I opted to give the One X a real road test before sharing my thoughts.

Ok, so two weeks in, here's the scoop:

  • The first thing you'll notice about the HTC One X is how light it is. Seriously, you'll probably keep thinking you lost it only to find it safely in your pocket. This phone is not small, actually the screen is huge, but it must be the lightest smartphone I've ever used. Once you get used to it, every other device feels like a paperweight.
  • Part of how HTC kept the weight down is by making the phone a sealed unit, with no openable compartment for battery replacement, and no slot for an SD card. Honestly, both of these restrictions worried me at first. But the truth is that I already carry all sorts of chargers with me, along with a rechargeable backup battery for any USB device, and I realized that I never even bought a second battery for my last phone, so, maybe the sealed battery is a non-issue. Maybe.
  • As for the lack of an SD card slot, this can be a very real limitation depending on what you use your phone for. I don't watch movies on mine, when I take pictures I usually move them to a NAS or to online storage pretty quickly, and any music is up on the cloud, so it's not that big a deal for me. But, if you do need greater local storage, this could be a real deal breaker.
  • I already mentioned the screen, it's huge, and bright, and a pleasure to view. It's also really smooth. This is something I had not paid attention to previously, but sliding your fingers across the glass is effortless and just feels better. I am a big Swype fan, and the difference can be felt immediately. I have no idea what they did to the glass, but it feels different from every other device I have here (including iPhone, Samsung devices, and other HTC devices).
  • The HTC One X comes in two versions, a quad-core Tegra 3, and a dual-core Snapdragon S4. Only the latter has AT&T LTE support, and being unwilling to part from my beloved LTE, that's what I opted for. And no complaints. The phone is as responsive as I need it to be, and never ever feels sluggish.
  • Talking about radios, the LTE support is incredible if you are fortunate enough to be in an area where AT&T LTE is supported. (I've used it in New York City, Miami, Atlanta, the Bay Area, and Kansas City, and while LTE speed varies greatly from location to location, it's always significantly faster than without it). And yes, the phone (both voice and data) worked flawlessly in Japan and Korea last week.
  • The HTC One X runs Android 4 (aka ICS), and I should note that there is no comparison running ICS on a device built for it, as opposed to one built for an older version and then upgraded. ICS does take a little getting used to, but when used on a device made for it, it feels just right.

So, is the phone perfect? I do have a few very minor complaints:

  • There is an odd Wi-Fi bug that causes the phone to sometimes think it's still connected to a Wi-Fi access point even when it that access point is no longer in range. It is as if the connection never times out. And because the phone thinks it's on Wi-Fi there is data connectivity over the cellular network. Quickly toggling Wi-Fi on and off solves the problem, but it is an annoyance.
  • There is a bug in the text messaging client. The default font is too big for me. You can change the display font, but the next time you open a test message the changed font size setting will be lost and you'll be back at the default. And yes, I know that's nitpicking, but it's still irritating.
  • This next one is a Swype issue, not an HTC one. Swype works beautifully on the HTC One X, except the first time you use it after powering the phone on. The keyboard ends up squished to about half the right width making it impossible to use. If you rotate the phone to horizontal and back to vertical it resizes properly, so not a biggie.
  • And finally, this one is an AT&T issue. AT&T originally only supported Visual Voicemail on iPhone, but recently added it to all of their LTE phones, all except the HTC One X! Huh? It's not an ICS compatibility issue, because Visual Voicemail was supported on the HTC Vivid after it was OTA upgraded to ICS. AT&T, please fix this one!

So, is the HTC One X the perfect smartphone? It's definitely the closest to perfect that I have seen yet. My few complaints are not fundamental device problems, and all feel like issues that could be addressed in a software or firmware update, and I really hope that an update is in the works. But, regardless, this phone is an absolute winner!

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25May
2012
Daniel Koestler On Developing Native Extensions For Adobe AIR

Daniel Koestler explains Developing native extensions for Adobe AIR, in an ADC tutorial which covers the compilation of native code on the Android platform.

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25May
2012
ColdFusion Code Coverage With Rancho

Code coverage is an essential part of testing, and is used to reflect the completeness of performed testing. Code coverage is instrumental in providing information about how much of the total code is actually tested by a test suite. Rancho is an experimental tool used to get code coverage for any ColdFusion application. Rancho can be used as a ColdFusion Builder extension or as an application.

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24May
2012
Where Is CFWACK10?

ColdFusion 10 has been released, and users have been asking about the update to our ColdFusion Web Application Construction Kit (aka CFWACK) books.

So, here's the scoop ...

ColdFusion 10 is a very important release, one which builds on the success of ColdFusion 9 by adding invaluable new features and functionality. And that is key, ColdFusion 10 does not change much about the previous release, it adds features and functionality. This means that ColdFusion 9 code and apps should just run as is in ColdFusion 10, and any books and tutorials on ColdFusion 9 apply to ColdFusion 10 as well.

And this presented me with a dilemma. CFWACK started off as a single volume, and then grew to two volumes, and have been three volumes since ColdFusion 8. With a cover price of close to $60 per volume, I could not in good conscience justify updating all the books and charging readers that much money when most of the content in the existing books remains current and applicable. Plus, in order to cover the new features in ColdFusion 10, I'd have had to remove chapters from the existing books, and as the ColdFusion's breadth and scope has increased, that has proven to be a very difficult task.

After lengthy discussions with the publisher, the ColdFusion product team, and my co-authors, we opted not to update the three CFWACK volumes for ColdFusion 10. Instead, we'd create a fourth volume, a "What's New In ColdFusion 10?" volume, intended to be an addition to the current series. This would be much fairer to ColdFusion users, and would also allow for the greatest possible content coverage.

So where is this new volume? Unfortunately (well, I guess it is actually fortunately) there was another recent major Adobe product release, CS6 and the Creative Cloud. The publisher had so many titles to create and update for these releases, that our title got stuck in the queue, and was thus very late leaving the gate.

So, on behalf of my co-authors, I apologize for the title not being ready with the product release. We will release this new volume, and I'll keep you updated on progress.

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23May
2012
ColdFusion 10 And Axis2

ColdFusion finally supports Axis2, and Milan Chandna explains Using Axis2 web services with ColdFusion 10 in this new ADC article.

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21May
2012
ColdFusion 10 And WebSockets

WebSocket is a web technology providing for bi-directional, full-duplex communications channels over a single TCP connection, and WebSocket support is new in ColdFusion 10. Awdhesh Kumar has posted an article entitled HTML5 WebSockets and ColdFusion – Part 1: An overview and first steps, and Kunal Saini continues the discussion in HTML5 WebSockets and ColdFusion - Part 2: Coding a Hello World sample and extending it into a chat application.

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15May
2012
ColdFusion 10 Docs

Here are all of the links you'll need to access ColdFusion 10 documenattion and help:

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15May
2012
ColdFusion Supports What?

Yep, I did indeed say that ColdFusion already supports HTML6 :-)

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